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  • Halpin, Rebecca (Dublin Business School, 2007)
    Article 44 of Bunreacht na hEireann provides for the Constitutional protection of religion and outlines the permissible levels of State endorsement. It proved to be one of the most difficult articles to write, with the ...
  • Uchiyama, Wataru (Dublin Business School, 2006)
    A constitution is not the mere papers on which fundamental principles and rights are listed. It is a living document which ensures that people live in a democratic society by limiting the powers of men who are supposed ...
  • McKenzie, Agnes (Dublin Business School, 1997)
    Juvenile crime, a major social problem in Ireland today on which the government and the tax payer spend large sums of money and energy without effecting any fundamental improvement, is on the rise, or is it?. It is clear ...
  • Quinn, Desmond (Dublin Business School, 1996)
    In the mid to latter part of the twentieth century, what has been described as a 'great depression' settled upon administrative law. This was most certainly the case in the United Kingdom where the absence of a constitution ...
  • Woods, John (Dublin Business School, 1996)
    The term nervous shock appears to have entered case law in the late-19th century and judging by the speeches of the privy council in Victorian Railway Commission v Coultas the term nervous shock entered the judicial language ...
  • White, Tremain (Dublin Business School, 1996)
    This study aims to assess tortious causation from a legal, and practicable perspective but draws firstly on the work of the leading philosophical exponents of same in order that it may be viewed in a context which most ...
  • Moloney, Martin (Dublin Business School, 1995)
    The first question to confront the researcher on this matter is the nature of organised crime: what is it? What does it comprise? What form does it take for the police? And for the courts? These are all questions which ...
  • McKeon, J.M. (Dublin Business School, 1995)
    In 1964 the House of Lords delivered a unanimous judgement, the point of which they said, was to clear up an ‘anomaly’ in the law. ‘Exemplary damages’ were the ‘anomaly’ of the law to which the House had referred. Amazing ...