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dc.contributor.advisorMurphy, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorde Oliveira Brandao, Priscilaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-21T16:00:13Z
dc.date.available2015-01-21T16:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationde Oliveira Brandao, P. (2014).The impact of stress and the role of hemispheric preference on decision making. Bachelors Final Year Project, Dublin Business School.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10788/2241
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to investigate how stress can affect the decision making process, and the role hemispheric preference plays on the decisions mechanism. The paper briefly explores the psychophysiology of stress, considering the impact it has on cognitive functions, and discussing individual differences in stress reactivity, particularly in terms of gender. Thirty participants (18 males, 12 females) answered The Zenhausern Preference Test, a well validated questionnaire used to measure the person’s preference of brain hemisphere. The participants were also exposed to the Cold Pressor Test (CPT), where they were asked to insert their hands into ice water for a maximum of 2 minutes. Resting heart rate and blood pressure measures were recorded at initial baseline and after the stressor task as an indicator of Sympathetic Nervous System activation. The effects of stress on decision making were measured by scores of speed and accuracy recorded in two Trail Making Tasks, the first before the CPT (control), and the second after the CPT. A one way ANOVA revealed a significant difference in number of errors before stress. A Tukey HSD Post hoc analysis showed that the significance exists between left and right hemispheric preferences (p= .013). The ANOVA also found a significant difference in the scores of speed after stressor. A Tukey Post hoc showed that the difference lies between left and right hemispheric preferences (p= .050). The numbers of errors after stress, as well as scores for validation of stress, were not significant. Additionally, there was no significant difference in decision making of men and women. Author keywords: stress, hemispheric preference, brain hemispheres, gender, decision making, cognition, cold pressor test, trail making tasken
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin Business Schoolen
dc.rightsItems in Esource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyright
dc.subjectThought and thinkingen
dc.subjectClinical health psychologyen
dc.titleThe impact of stress and the role of hemispheric preference on decision makingen
dc.typeFinal Year Projecten
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The authoren
dc.type.degreenameBA (Hons) in Psychologyen
dc.type.degreelevelBA (Hons)en


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