Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGaughran, Fergusen
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Shaneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T12:14:43Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T12:14:43Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationO'Neill, S. (1997). European Monetary Unification: A study on how it will affect financial institutions & business operations. Bachelors Final Year Project, Dublin Business School.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10788/2751
dc.description.abstractThere have been two great drivers towards European Union. The first has been the overwhelming political desire for peace. The second has been the movement towards economic integration both to create stability and wealth, and to underpin the political drive to bring European countries closer together. The success of the last forty years has been dramatic. The move to a single market in particular has been of great benefit. In voting for the Maastricht Treaty back in 1992, Ireland voted to strengthen EU economic and monetary co-operation and to eventually introduce European Monetary Union EMU in Ireland with a Single European Currency. We do not have an opt-out clause like UK and Denmark. Irelands original long standing currency union with sterling ceased in 1979 as Ireland joined the European JVlonetary System, the EMU forerunner - while sterling did not. Monetary Union is another step towards increased E. U. economic integration. Already this decade we have seen the creation of the single market with the elimination of intra-EU trade barriers, the easing and the eventual elimination in January 1993 of Foreign Exchange controls. There is an immense determination in much of Europe that the single currency will happen on Jan 1 1999, despite the somewhat unhelpful reactions to certain reports regarding membership criteria in recent months. Businesses in both the Financial & Industrial sectors trading in Europe will have to face the reality that EMU is likely to start on schedule, with major impacts on customers and business operations. Organisations must consider the strategic and tactical implications of monetary unification. EMU will have dramatic and dynamic effects on marketplaces and business success in the medium term. The conversion to the new currency presents major challenges for us all. This thesis takes a close look at how EMU will affect business dealings within Ireland and also Europe. How increased market size and decreased trade barriers should present businesses in all sectors with increased opportunities. We then examine the implications of EMU from within, looking closely at legal and accounting procedures that have to be amended. Finally this thesis looks at the preparatory measures which organisations from all sectors and especially the financial sectors need to address if EMU is to be a success for them individually. Even though the predominant tone of this thesis is one of informed speculation, particularly when not even the members states who invented the notion know how it is going to evolve, one thing that is not for speculation is the fact that European Monetary Unification is going to bring radical and irreversible changes to how businesses operate. EMU is going to happen and it is up to every organisation to see that they are not left in the dark.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin Business Schoolen
dc.rightsItems in Esource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyright
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.titleEuropean monetary unification : a study on how it will affect financial institutions & business operationsen
dc.typeFinal Year Projecten
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The authoren
dc.type.degreenameBA (Hons) in Business Studiesen
dc.type.degreelevelBA (Hons)en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record