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dc.contributor.authorHyland, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Sineaden
dc.contributor.authorO'Hora, Denisen
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Julianen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-16T14:30:24Z
dc.date.available2016-05-16T14:30:24Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationHyland, J. M., O’ Hora, D. P., Leslie, J. C. & Smyth, S. (2014). The effect of before and after instructions on the speed of sequential responding. The Psychological Record, 64(2), 311 - 319.en
dc.identifier.issn2163-3452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10788/2921
dc.description.abstractOrder judgements are slower and less accurate when reversed. That is, when participants see two events in a sequence (e.g., circle …square), they are quicker to report ‘Before’ statements (e.g., “Circle before Square”) than ‘After’ statements (“Square after Circle”). The current study sought to determine whether a reversal effect will also occur when participants are instructed to produce a sequence of responses. Twenty participants were trained to criterion on simple ‘Before’ and ‘After’ instructions that specified sequences of two responses (e.g., “Circle before Square”). In a subsequent test, participants produced instructed sequences (e.g., circle … square) more quickly and more reliably when instructed to choose one stimulus before another than when they were requested to choose one stimulus after another. The implications of these findings for current theories of relational responding are considered. Author keywords: Before, after, sequential responding, temporal instructions, relational responding, mutual entailmenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Psychological Recorden
dc.rightsItems in Esource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyright
dc.source.urihttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40732-014-0026-y
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectThought and thinkingen
dc.titleThe effect of before and after instructions on the speed of sequential respondingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.versionPostprinten
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The publisheren


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