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dc.contributor.advisorQuinn, Bernadetteen
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Sandraen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-17T13:22:16Z
dc.date.available2016-11-17T13:22:16Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationKeenan, S. (2016). Friend or foe. Are mobile phones helping or hindering romantic relationships? Bachelors Final Year Project, Dublin Business School.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10788/3038
dc.description.abstractMobile phone usage is, according to Madrid, a compulsive and addictive disorder which looks set to become one of the biggest non-drug addictions of the 21st century (Madrid, 2003). As levels of mobile phone usage are increasing in Ireland every year (cso.ie, 12/04/2016) it is important to address the effects this increase in usage may be having on our lives and especially the effects it may be having on romantic relationships. The results from previous research undertaken in this area suggest that men suffer higher levels of addictive behaviors than woman (Malviya et al, 2014). Other key findings founded that mobile phones are a representation of a person’s identity (Vincent, 2006) and that mobile phones are the cause for conflict in relationships (Elphinston and Noller, 2011). Other findings were that couple communication and relationship satisfaction were largely correlated (Rehman and Holtzworth- Munroe, 2007), especially for woman. The researcher set out to identify if these findings could be supported in Ireland. The key results of this current study were; overall more women signalled that they could not imagine their lives without a mobile phone, which therefore signals higher levels of addiction towards the mobile phone device in woman in comparison to men. Mobile phones were also reported to be the cause of past arguments for couples as 59.3% of couples agreed that mobile phones had caused an argument between them and their partner in the past. Woman also experienced higher levels of emotional responses when separated from their devices; however men do experience higher feelings of separation than woman. There was also a non-correlation between affection and satisfaction therefore meaning it could not be confirmed 5 that people who are more satisfied in their relationships use their mobile phones to express affection regularly. Author keywords: Addiction, romantic relationships, mobile phone, usage, conflicten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin Business Schoolen
dc.rightsItems in Esource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyright
dc.subjectSociologyen
dc.titleFriend or foe. Are mobile phones helping or hindering romantic relationships?en
dc.typeFinal Year Projecten
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The authoren
dc.type.degreenameBA (Hons) in Social Scienceen
dc.type.degreelevelBA (Hons)en


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