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dc.contributor.authorFahey, Gerry
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T12:14:41Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T12:14:41Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationFahey, G. (2018) ‘Faking Good and Personality Assessments of Job applicants: A Review of the Literature’, DBS Business Review, 2.en
dc.identifier.issn2565-5272
dc.identifier.urihttps://esource.dbs.ie/handle/10788/3605
dc.description.abstractHigh stakes selection contexts often drive the provision of socially desirable responses from job applicants. This can take the form of ‘faking good’ and can lead to inaccurate personality assessments. This article reviews the extant research on the extent to which faking good occurs, the psychological factors that may lead to faking good by job applicants, and how faking good is measured. In particular, the review considers the role of moral hypocrisy in this regard and considers how it can be minimised.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDBS Library Pressen
dc.rightsItems in eSource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyrighten
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.22375/dbr.v2i0.25en
dc.subjectPersonnel managementen
dc.subjectPersonality assessmenten
dc.subjectExecutives--Recruitingen
dc.titleFaking Good and Personality Assessments of Job applicants: A Review of the Literatureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The authoren


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