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dc.contributor.advisorGibbons, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorFlood, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-21T10:05:55Z
dc.date.available2019-08-21T10:05:55Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationFlood, A. (2019). Driver’s indirect aggression and stress level’s effect on driving behaviour. Bachelors Final Year Project, Dublin Business School.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://esource.dbs.ie/handle/10788/3836
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between stress and indirect aggression on driving behaviours. These variables were investigated as there was lack of research to examine this. Gender, and age were also examined in other analyses. A total of 84 participants completed the questionnaire and results of the questionnaires were investigated. The study was a cross-sectional, correlational study, which used survey research to examine the hypotheses. The results of a Pearson’s r correlation determined no significant result of the relationship between stress and indirect aggression on driving behaviours. Of the two independent samples T-tests that were run, one was found to be partially significant, with use of malicious humour (a sub-scale of indirect aggression) being identified to be higher in males than in females.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin Business Schoolen
dc.rightsItems in Esource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyrighten
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectAggressionen
dc.subjectRoad rageen
dc.titleDriver’s indirect aggression and stress level’s effect on driving behaviouren
dc.typeFinal Year Projecten
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The authoren
dc.type.degreenameBA (Hons) in Psychologyen
dc.type.degreelevelBA


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