Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorO’Donnell, Siobainen
dc.contributor.advisorDonohue, Gráinneen
dc.contributor.authorCanavan, Réamonn
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-17T19:59:49Z
dc.date.available2021-02-17T19:59:49Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationCanavan, R. (2020). Where do we stand with OCD: Psychotherapists recognition of, and treatment recommendations for, individuals presenting with taboo intrusive thoughts. Masters Thesis, Dublin Business School.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://esource.dbs.ie/handle/10788/4095
dc.description.abstractObsessive compulsive disorder is a prevalent mental health problem and is characterised by high levels of morbidity. It can present in a variety of ways and research suggests that taboo intrusive thoughts are less likely to be recognised as OCD in comparison to more recognisable forms. Most individuals with OCD do not receive adequate therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to examine psychotherapists appraisals of clients presenting with specific OCD symptoms. This study was a cross sectional vignette-based survey of 514 accredited psychotherapists in Ireland. Each participant was randomly assigned to a vignette describing a client with different OCD subtypes – paedophilia, aggressive, religious, homosexuality, contamination and symmetry intrusive thoughts. Participants were asked for their interpretations of the presenting symptoms, their treatment recommendations and to rate their confidence in their responses. Perceived dangerousness and willingness to work with the client were also investigated. This study was a cross sectional vignette-based survey of 514 accredited psychotherapists in Ireland. Each participant was randomly assigned to a vignette describing a client with different OCD subtypes – paedophilia, aggressive, religious, homosexuality, contamination and symmetry intrusive thoughts. Participants were asked for their interpretations of the presenting symptoms, their treatment recommendations and to rate their confidence in their responses. Perceived dangerousness and willingness to work with the client were also investigated. Participants who were presented with the contamination and symmetry vignettes were significantly more likely to accurately identify OCD than those presented with the taboo intrusive thoughts vignettes. Participants also attributed greater levels of stigma to clients with taboo intrusive thoughts. Participants who correctly identified OCD were significantly more likely to recommend an evidence-based treatment. Confidence was a poor predictor of OCD identification and evidence-based treatment recommendations. The results suggest a lack of awareness of certain types of OCD presentation amongst psychotherapists in Ireland, and of beneficial therapeutic interventions for OCD. The implications of this, and possible applications of these results, are discussed in the dissertation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin Business Schoolen
dc.rightsItems in Esource are protected by copyright. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher/copyright holder.en
dc.rights.urihttp://esource.dbs.ie/copyrighten
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive disorderen
dc.titleWhere do we stand with OCD: Psychotherapists recognition of, and treatment recommendations for, individuals presenting with taboo intrusive thoughtsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright: The authoren
dc.type.degreenameMA in Psychotherapyen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record