Do adolescents learn or remember more effectively when materials are presented visual or aurally?

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Authors
Roberts, Carla
Issue Date
2012
Degree
BA (Hons) in Psychology
Publisher
Dublin Business School
Rights
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Abstract
Memory is the mental faculty of retaining and recalling past experiences. Pectoral stimuli are encoded into both a visual store and an acoustic store which is believed to be superior to aurally presented words, which are encoded only into an acoustic store. The present study examined the possibility that visually presented stimuli are more easily recalled than aurally presented stimuli. More specifically that visually presented images are recalled more easily than visually words or aurally presented words. 58 student participants were divided into three groups; group 1 were exposed to 20 aurally presented words, group 2 were exposed to 20 visually presented images and group 3 were exposed to 20 visually presented words. The experiment examined the difference in the number of correctly recalled responses by each group and by gender. There was found to be no significant difference in the number of correctly recalled responses by each group and by gender. The present also examined the possibility that the words located at the beginning and end of a list of words / images / sounds will be more accurately recalled than those in the middle of the sequence. There was found to be a significant difference of correctly recalled words that were located at the beginning of the list. Author keywords: Cognition, memory, recall, visual memory, sensory memory, primacy regency
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