The role of rational and irrational beliefs in positive and negative mental health outcomes

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Authors
Morley, Kevin
Issue Date
2014
Degree
BA (Hons) in Psychology
Publisher
Dublin Business School
Rights
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Abstract
The current research investigated whether irrational beliefs (Demandingness, catastrophizing, Low Frustration Tolerance [LFT], and depreciation beliefs) as defined by REBT theory were central cognitive constructs in the prediction of loneliness. The results indicated that higher levels of depreciation beliefs, and higher levels of catastrophizing beliefs, predict higher levels of psychological distress. Little is currently known in either area of REBT or positive psychology regarding the role of rational beliefs processes (preferences, non-catastrophizing, high frustration tolerance, and acceptance) in the prediction of positive mental health outcomes. This study was a novel attempt to represent the first empirical test of Albert Ellis’s REBT model of psychological health in the prediction of positive mental health outcomes. Also investigated were the predictions of REBT’s theory of psychological health by investigating whether rational belief processes (preferences, non-catastrophizing, high frustration tolerance, and acceptance) can significantly predict levels of happiness, satisfaction with life, and optimism respectively. Of all the rational belief processes, acceptance was most influential in predicting levels of happiness. An analysis was run to see if there was a statistically significant difference between men and women negative mental health but unfortunately nothing of significance emerged.
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