Effects on students opinions, attitudes and behaviour, in relation to smoking, drinking and drug use, based on school policy to test or not

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Authors
Egan, Mary
Issue Date
2004
Degree
MA in Addiction Studies
Publisher
Dublin Business School
Rights
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Abstract
This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of school's policy of prevention based on their policy to test for alcohol and drugs The experimental hypotheses were; that students from schools with a policy to test, would have more negative attitudes and opinions and engage less in smoking drinking and drug use. The Independent Variable (IV) was a policy to test or not, demographic variables age and social class were also taken into account. The dependant variables (D V) were smoking, drinking and drug use. A researcher-designed questionnaire was circulated to 4 post- primary schools, 2 with a policy to test and 2 with a no test policy( n= 149). Frequencies and A one-way independent samples ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate the impact of (1) age, (2) gender on smoking, drinking and drug use. A significant difference was found between age of males (16.63) and females (16.37). 2.9% of the variance was accountedfor by difference in age. (F [1,47]= 4.32, P<0.05), Eta squared = 0.029. A significant difference was found between age and smoking (F [1, 147] = 5.12, P<0.05), Eta squared = 0.034.A 3% of the variance between groups, based on age, was accounted for by smoking, with older students reporting a higher rate of smoking. ANOVA was conducted to evaluate the impact of gender on lie scale. No significant difference was found between groups based on lie score (F [1, 145] = 10.262, p<0.05). Eta Squared = 0.067. A 6.7% of variance between groups was based on lie score. ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate the impact of policy on smoking (F[1, 147] = 5.2, p, 0. 05), drinking (F[I, 146]=2.193,p, 0. 05 and drugs (Fl, 147]=3.3,p, 0. 05). A series of Chi-square, Cross tabulations and Multiple Regressions were conducted. Males engaged in drinking, more thanfemales (B=3.22 p, 0. 05). Policy was not a predictor of drug status. The conclusion was that there was insufficient evidence that a policy to test had any influence over student's attitudes or behaviours in relation to smoking, drinking or drug use.