Investigating both the relationship between CSE and academic satisfaction/performance and the validity of CSE.

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Authors
O'Gorman, James
Issue Date
2014
Degree
BA (Hons) in Psychology
Publisher
Dublin Business School
Rights
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Abstract
The first aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CSE and academic satisfaction as well as the relationship between self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control and emotional stability and academic satisfaction. The second aim of the study was to investigate whether CSE was a predictor of academic performance as well as investigating whether self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control and emotional stability were also predictors of academic performance. The third aim of the study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between CSE and the individual traits of CSE (self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control and emotional stability). A survey comprised of five scales assessing the psychological measures and three open ended items assessing academic satisfaction and academic performance was distributed to 90 participants attending an undergraduate. Results found that only CSE and self-esteem had a significant relationship with academic satisfaction. Results also found that CSE as well as the individual psychological traits of CSE were not predictors of academic performance. The final findings of the study were that neither CSE nor the individual traits of CSE were predictors of students’ estimated degree classification that will be received. The results also found that CSE has a significant relationship with self-esteem, self-efficacy and emotional stability but not with locus of control. The implications of these findings are discussed along with recommendations for future research.
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