An investigation into the relationship between religion, self-esteem, perceived stress and general health in a student sample

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Authors
Murphy, Patricia
Issue Date
2009
Degree
BA in Psychology
Publisher
Dublin Business School
Rights
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Abstract
The present study was conducted with the aim of investigating if a relationship exists between religion and self-esteem, perceived stress and general health. It was conducted using a sample of part time students (n=81). Each participant completed a questionnaire that comprised of a religiosity scale, Rosenberg's self-esteem measure, the perceived stress scale and the general health measure, GHQ-12. The sample was randomly selected. They hypotheses stated that, H1 a higher level of religiosity would predict a higher level of self-esteem, H2 a higher level of religiosity would predict a lower level of perceived stress, H3 a higher level of religiosity would predict a higher level of general health and H4 a higher level of stress would predict a lower level of self-esteem. Previous research with regard to the relationship between religion and self-esteem and stress has generally come up with differing findings. The current study found no significant relationship between religion and self-esteem and perceived stress and so accepted the null hypoFinal Year Project of H1 and H2. The findings with regard to H3 supported previous research in finding that there was a significant relationship between religiosity and general health and so rejected the null hypoFinal Year Project. The findings concerning H4 also supported previous research in showing a significant, negative, strong relationship between self-esteem and stress therefore also rejecting the null hypoFinal Year Project.
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