Employee awareness of their alcohol use

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Authors
Meehan, Laura
Issue Date
2009
Degree
BA Counselling and Psychotherapy
Publisher
Dublin Business School
Rights
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Abstract
There is an enormous amount of research that tells of the consequences of alcohol use. It tells what alcohol is, how it affects us and of the relationship we have with it. If taken sensibly and in moderation it can be a relaxing and pleasurable experience. However despite the damage and serious consequences when taken in excess it remains the drug of choice for a lot of people. Many surveys have been carried out that tells the readers of the risks and damage that society is faced with. The cost to individuals and governments is very high. To get a sample of the population who are of the legal age limit to carry out this study a sample was taken from the workforce. The study sets out to investigate if there was an awareness of the effects that alcohol has on the individual. A short questionnaire was used to gather information. It consisted of 12 questions, including the CAGE questionnaire developed by Dr JA Ewing, USA to ascertain if an alcohol problem exists. The results showed a surprisingly high number of people who have an alcohol problem and despite this they continue to drink recklessly. Included in the questionnaire used was a question relating to support services that the employer provides to assist people with an alcohol problem. The results show that there is some that are aware of limited services and others are unaware of any service available to them. The study also acknowledges the Employee Assistance Program EAP that appears to be the most popular choice of service provided. The study concludes with a quote from Trice who suggests that the workplace may be an ideal place for problematic drinkers to get help, not only from EAP programmes but from fellow colleagues.